hunt for red october true story


Sablin also ensured that the radar was off to avoid detection from Soviet forces.[3]. In 1990, the book was turned into a film starring Sean Connery. Sablin was disabled and his supporters dispersed as the bombers flew above their heads.

In that address, he was going to say what he believed people publicly wanted to say, but could only be said in private: that socialism and the motherland were in danger; the ruling authorities were up to their necks in corruption, demagoguery, graft, and lies, leading the country into an abyss; communism had been discarded, and there was a need to revive the Leninist principles of justice. The living standards of the working class deteriorated, while the Party apparatchiks lived a life of plenty. Soon after, a second squadron was sent in.

The ship's steering was damaged and she stopped dead on the water 20 miles from Swedish territorial waters and 330 miles from Kronstadt.

One of the officers managed to escape and inform the command of Sablin’s plan. Valery Sablin, a brilliant young political officer, seized control of the ship by convincing half the officers and all …

On 7th of November, the Soviet Union celebrated the 75th anniversary of the Revolution of 1905. [3], On discovering that they might soon be detected, Sablin decided to set sail immediately, rather than wait till the morning and set sail with the rest of the fleet, as originally planned. Sablin then moved on to the next phase of the plan, which was to win the support of the seamen, numbering about 145-155 men. Providing inspiration for Tom Clancy's The Hunt for Red October, the 1975 mutiny aboard the Soviet destroyer Storozhevoy (translated Sentry) aimed at nothing less than the overthrow of Leonid Brezhnev and the Soviet government. It was involved in a mutiny led by Valery Sablin in November 1975. Privacy • Legal & Trademarks • Campus Map.

This idealist strongly believed in the accomplishments of the October Revolution and strongly opposed the bureaucratic treatment of the “Worker’s State” by the Soviet administration. Storozhevoy continued in service until the late 1990s.

Suppressed in the Soviet Union for fifteen years, Young (the first American to uncover the mutiny twenty years ago) and Braden finally tell the untold story relying on recently declassified KGB documents as well as the Sablin family's papers.

After warning shots from the closing loyal warships, the frigate was eventually boarded by Soviet marine commandos. As he had the support of the sailors, he decided to lock up the ones who opposed the idea together with the imprisoned captain. He radioed that the mutiny was extinguished and that the ship was once again under Soviet control. He was executed on 3rd of August, 1976. The leadership in Kremlin was gravely concerned and outraged. Even though the system was corrupt, with many Soviet citizens dissatisfied, it was still considered firm, as no political opposition to the Communist Party existed. When Soviet authorities learned of the mutiny, the Kremlin ordered that control must be regained, fearing Sablin might follow in Jonas Pleškys's footsteps to ask political asylum in Sweden.

As for the two main offenders ― Shein was sentenced to eight years in prison with the obligation that prevented him from ever mentioning the reasons for his punishment. An educated Marxist-Leninist, he used his position as a Political Commissar aboard the battleship Sentry (Russian: Сторожевой, “guard” or “Sentry”) to gain the trust of the crew. The Sentry was stationed in the Gulf of Riga (today’s Estonia) on the Baltic Coast. The event was quickly covered up, but it resurfaced after the dissolution of the USSR. Gregory D. Young was the first Westerner to investigate the mutiny as part of his 1982 master's thesis Mutiny on Storozhevoy: A Case Study of Dissent in the Soviet Navy, and later in the book The Last Sentry by Young and Nate Braden. The “Hunt for the Red October” was first written by a famous spy-genre novelist, Tom Clancy in 1984. The second squadron damaged the ship, and the sailors feared for their lives, as they saw that the revolution was a failure.

He quickly addressed the pilots and called them to join him, by refusing to bomb the ship.

The book and the film are loosely based on the true events surrounding a mutiny on the Soviet Burevestnik-class anti-submarine frigate (NATO reporting name Krivak) that was led by a political officer Valery Sablin. Providing inspiration for Tom Clancy's The Hunt for Red October, the 1975 mutiny aboard the Soviet destroyer Storozhevoy (translated Sentry) aimed at nothing less than the overthrow of Leonid Brezhnev and the Soviet government. [1], On the evening of 9 November 1975, Sablin lured the captain to the lower deck, claiming that there were some officers who needed to be disciplined for being drunk on duty. The thesis was placed in the United States Naval Academy archives where it was read by Tom Clancy, then an insurance salesman, who used it as inspiration to write The Hunt for Red October. He was forced to travel through international waters near the Swedish island of Gotland, in order to reach Leningrad, and was thus suspected to be a defector at first.

The sailors loved him and were loyal to him, rather than the ship’s captain, Anatoly Putorny. It is a gripping account of a disillusioned idealist forced to make the agonizing choice between working within or destroying the system he is sworn to protect. He set sail out into the Baltic Sea, planning to reach Leningrad (now Saint Petersburg) where he would agitate the people to join what he saw as a continuation of the October Revolution. Leonid Brezhnev, who was the president of USSR at the time represented the pinnacle of hypocrisy within the Party. This article is about the Soviet frigate built in the 1970s and host to a mutiny. The Last Sentry: The True Story That Inspired The Hunt for Red October. Sablin was a popular officer and he used this to his advantage. This time, the commanders convinced the pilots that Sablin was, in fact, a defector who only used his rhetoric to get away with the ship and escape to Sweden. During his mandate, the corruption was at its peak. Sablin decided to broadcast his call to arms immediately, but his radio operator was so scared of retribution that he channeled the speech only on the official Navy frequency where it was heard by their commanders and not by the people. Sablin prepared the sailors on the Sentry for the upcoming mutiny by emphasizing the role of Navy men in the October Revolution and the Revolution of 1905, which involved a rebellion on the battleship Potemkin.

He organized a vote, and it was a tie. The pilots couldn’t fire on their comrades-in-arms. Valery Sablin was well-known as a man who couldn’t stand for injustice. They demanded the ship be captured or sunk.

One of the officers who had voted in favor of the mutiny had escaped under the cover of night and had run across the naval dock to raise the alarm; however, the soldier at the gate did not believe him. But the real subversive aboard the Sentry was the Commissar himself. The aircraft also strafed Storozhevoy repeatedly. She was transferred to the Russian Pacific Fleet and later sold to India for scrap. A search party was sent after them. The event was also made into a 1925 silent film by Sergei Eisenstein and is considered today to be one of the cinema’s greatest masterpieces. Eight against eight.

One of his main duties was to hold lectures to the sailors about the official politics of the Soviet Union. Half the Baltic fleet,[4] including thirteen naval vessels, were sent in pursuit and were joined by 60 warplanes[4] (including three Yak-28 fighters), which dropped 500-pound bombs in the vicinity of the rebel ship.

Here a vote was taken amongst the fifteen officers present.

[5] All the complement from Storozhevoy was arrested and interrogated, but only Sablin and his second-in-command, Alexander Shein, a 20-year-old seaman, were tried and convicted. Sablin was sentenced to death, despite the fact that the punishment for mutiny in the Soviet Union was 15 years in prison.

It depicts a rogue Soviet submarine captain who tries to defect to America, but by doing so causes confusion that almost leads to war. At his trial in July 1976, Sablin was convicted of high treason and was executed by shooting on 3 August 1976, while Shein was sentenced to prison and was released after serving eight years.

While Shein rallied the sailors who unanimously supported Sablin and his call to arms, the architect of the mutiny was busy convincing his fellow officers to join him. The mutiny was led by the ship's political commissar, Captain of the Third Rank Valery Sablin, who wished to protest against the rampant corruption of the Leonid Brezhnev era.

In 1990, the book was turned into a film starring Sean Connery. The rest of the mutineers were set free but dishonorably discharged from the Soviet Navy.[6].

He assembled the crew and delivered a speech which instantly had all the seamen motivated and excited about a revolution. Sablin then summoned a meeting of all the senior officers on the ship.

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Sablin intended to broadcast a speech that included a number of topics that people whispered among themselves for a long time ― that the revolution and motherland were in danger; that the ruling authorities were up to their necks in corruption, demagoguery, graft, and lies, leading the country into an abyss; that the ideals of Communism had been discarded; and that there was a pressing need to revive Leninist principles of justice. It depicts a rogue Soviet submarine captain who tries to defect to America, but by doing so causes confusion that almost leads to war.

When the captain arrived at the lower deck, Sablin detained him and other officers in the forward sonar compartment and seized control of the ship. Right: Valery Sablin The “Hunt for the Red October” was first written by a famous spy-genre novelist, Tom Clancy in 1984. A sort of a miracle happened.

The Potemkin affair was highly influential for Sablin, as the sailors aboard that historical ship formed the backbone of the revolution. Even though there is a foothold in truth concerning the story, the main premise is completely the opposite ― Sablin (contrary to Connery’s character, Marko Ramius) didn’t want to defect to the West, but to become the leader of the Second Russian Revolution.

The thesis was placed in the United States Naval Academy archives where it was read by Tom Clancy, then an insurance salesman, who used it as inspiration to write The Hunt for Red October. The crew was changed completely and the ship made extensive visits to foreign ports. Thus, Sablin knew that only a symbolic act strong enough could reverse the doings of the USSR leadership and return his country on what he believed was the right path. He gathered his most loyal sailors, among them the 20-year-old Alexander Shein, and the plot was in effect.

Sablin informed the officers that he planned to sail to Leningrad and broadcast his revolutionary message.

Through his lectures, he gained followers, but he still needed the momentum. First, they locked the captain bellow deck.

Valery Sablin, a brilliant young political officer, seized control of the ship by convincing half the officers and all of the sailors to sail to Leningrad, where they would launch a new Russian Revolution. Thus, the revolutionary officer was forced to react quickly. Gregory D. Young was the first Westerner to investigate the mutiny as part of his 1982 master's thesis Mutiny on Storozhevoy: A Case Study of Dissent in the Soviet Navy, and later in the book The Last Sentry by Young and Nate Braden.

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